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"Once you have made peace with the present moment, see what happens, what you can do or choose to do, or rather what life does through you. There are three words that convey the secret of the art of living, the secret of all success and happiness: One with Life. Being one with life is being one with Now. You then realize that you don't live your life, but life lives you. Life is the dancer and you are the dance." –Eckhart Tolle, A New Earth #eckharttolle #anewearth #spiritual #spirituality #presentmoment #thenow #peace #choice #consciousness #secret #artofliving #onewithlife #life #beingone #lifelivesyou #lifeisthedancer #youarethedance #dance #beintheworldbutnotofit #shift #perception #perspective #gowiththeflow #letgo #lettinggo #truth #ego #atidecremlifeproject

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20140905-173526.jpgDaring Greatly by Brené Brown! One for me and two to give to friends!

hopeI first heard of Anne Lamott from my good friend, S, and she gave me her latest book, Help. Thanks. Wow: The Three Essential Prayers. In it, Anne wrote that asking for help, giving thanks for what we have, and being amazed at all the beauty that surrounds us are the three ways that spiritually connects us with the Higher Power and give us hope during trying times.

My cable company had four past episodes of Super Soul Sunday available, and two of those were with Anne Lamott, so I watched the first part today.

Near the end of part one, Anne Lamott spoke about hope after she recalled a conversation she had with a priest about her friend, Pammy, who was dying 20 years ago.  She asked the priest if God would help Pammy when she crossed over, if Pammy’s young daughter would be okay, and if she would see Pammy again one day.

“He said, ‘I hope so.’ And I never forgot that, because we live in the hope — in the hope of truth, in the hope of light, in the hope of spiritual healing. Because first of all, to hope makes you so vulnerable. If your heart is open, it’s going to get bruised and knocked around the world, and life is going to knock you around. But to hope, it is to be a child again,” Ms. Lamott shared.

What Anne Lamott said reminded me of Dr. Brené Brown’s take on vulnerability. “To love someone fiercely, to believe in something with your whole heart, to celebrate a fleeting moment in time, to fully engage in a life that doesn’t come with guarantees – these are risks that involve vulnerability and often pain. But, I’m learning that recognizing and leaning into the discomfort of vulnerability teaches us how to live with joy, gratitude and grace.” 

Having an open heart is opening yourself up to anything and everything, good and bad, and hoping is believing that no matter what, all will be well.

I am grateful for hope.

Links:

Super Soul Sunday with Anne Lamott

Related posts:

Day 17/365: On Vulnerability

Day 23/365: Go With The Flow

I grew up in a culture in which girls had to prove that they are just as capable as boys.  To be a daughter in a culture in which sons are golden, I had to prove my worth.  I had to ignore my limitations. I had to learn to be invincible.

So when I got sick and I was crippled with pain a few times, I really detested being in a position to ask for help.  I felt vulnerable.  Weak.  I felt like Wonder Woman all my life until October of 2012.

I have a really good friend, R, whom I have known for maybe 5 months, but I totally bonded with.  Interestingly enough and serendipitously, everything in R‘s path were cleared so that my friend can focus on healing, except R wouldn’t ask for help and remained very independent–while still continuing to help others.  R is back in the hospital and we are all worried, but because of R, I learned something valuable.

In part 1 of Oprah’s Lifeclass with Dr. Brené Brown, Dr. Brown said something really profound…

“When you cannot accept and ask for help without self-judgment, then when you offer other people help, you are always doing so with judgment.”

How many of you know people who are dreadfully sick?  How many of them are so nice and so giving that you can’t believe that they could have cancer, an incurable disease, or something else just as dreadful?

I heard, earlier this month, at the Hay House World Summit via a conversation with Dr. Lissa Rankin, that most people who are sick are those who are constantly giving of themselves and they often fail to take care of their own selves.  They keep on helping others, until they are derailed by sickness, and they become the ones that need help.

TimeStill today, I am always ready to help others, just like R, but I also realized that it is not only important to take care of myself, but that in order to help myself, sometimes I need to be gracious enough to ask for and accept help.

So, R, I know you will eventually read this because I practically shoved the link down your throat… ;D  We are here for you.  You don’t even have to ask, but please do!  Do it for self-love!  Do it for you!  We are ready to give you our most precious gift… our time.

Some links:

Dr. Brené Brown on Help and Judging (Huffington Post article)
Dr. Brené Brown on Help and Judging Video (Oprah’s Lifeclass)
Hay House World Summit (2014)
Dr. Lissa Rankin
Rick Warren

I am grateful for Oprah’s Lifeclass with Dr. Brené Brown, Part 1 (watching Part 2 soon). I may be one of the few people who haven’t heard of her, but I now know who Dr. Brown is. Wow!

Here are some of her quotes:

“Vulnerability is the birthplace of innovation, creativity and change.”

“Staying vulnerable is a risk we have to take if we want to experience connection.”

“We cultivate love when we allow our most vulnerable and powerful selves to be deeply seen and known, and when we honor the spiritual connection that grows from that offering with trust, respect, kindness and affection.”

When I started this blog, I really vacillated on how much of myself to share. I was afraid of being vulnerable.

You see, this is my second blog. I started my first blog almost a year ago, and for the most part, it is anonymous. In it, I wrote about my past emotional and physical pain, and what I learned from facing my pain, abuse, mistrust, and my fears–in order to live my most authentic self.

I felt that my first blog helped me to face past baggages, cleanse, and find myself. I am grateful I was able to get a lot of things off my chest and make positive changes in my life. I feel that I have transcended most of the obstacles of my past and can now move on–which also meant, letting go of the first blog.

I knew that by putting this second blog up, I will publicly be putting myself out there, especially when I start working on my bucket list and posting images of my adventures as I complete them.

After watching part 1 of the Lifeclass with Dr, Brené Brown, I realized that vulnerability is also part of living life fully, and opening myself up is a brave thing to do and can help me connect much better with others.

Dr. Brown said, “there’s nothing more daring than showing up, putting ourselves out there and letting ourselves be seen.”

Being vulnerable allows us to be our most authentic selves.

I am grateful also to the people who have followed me thus far, and for sharing their own experiences, thoughts, and stories in their own blogs–and for showing their own vulnerabilities also. Thank you for our new connection and for inspiring me with you own posts.


Some links to share:

Brené Brown’s Site
Oprah’s Lifeclass with Dr. Brené Brown

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